We are proud to present a new MEDLIFE project in Kilimanjaro! Thanks to the hard work of our MEDLIFE team we were able to make much-needed improvements to Kilema Primary School, a school that will benefit more than 200 students and teachers in the community of Kilema. 

Kilema, located in Marangu (Moshi), is a community of just over 20,000 inhabitants. During a mobile clinic nearby, the director of the local school petitioned for MEDLIFE's support in order to construct new school bathrooms, as well as renovate the exterior of the classrooms, which had been flooded during heavy seasonal rains. The flooding not only interrupted classes but also damaged the rooms and put the health of the children at risk. The toilets being used at the school presented another health risk, as they were dirty and lacked a proper drainage system. Many children had even had stomach complications and were still afraid to use the bathroom during school hours.

unnamedOriginally, the bathrooms did not have toilets, running water, and some of the stalls lacked doors

For this project, MEDLIFE renovated the toilets, repaired the administrative offices, acquired a water tank for the bathrooms, painted the classrooms and constructed a water drainage system so that rainwater would not flood the school in the future. Students, teachers, and parents all participated in the renovations. After everything was completed, the community was very happy with all the improvements that were made!

unnamed 8The new bathrooms have proper doors, new toilets, and water tank to supply them with water. Also, new bathrooms for the teachers were built, so kids have their own bathrooms.

unnamed 2Classrooms were painted and a drainage system was built to avoid future flooding.

unnamed 3A thank-you letter was sent to our Tanzania team from the Kilema Primary School!

 

 

Five months ago Peru was hit with historic rains, resulting in flash floods and mudslides known as "huaicos". The destruction of essential infrastructure such as bridges and homes severely damaged the communities we partner with. Support and donations from our global network of MEDLIFE Chapters and volunteers allowed us to begin immediate aid in the form of water, clothing and medical care when the disaster hit. During initial efforts to provide relief, MEDLIFE met a concerned mother from a local school, Colegio Inmaculada in Naña, who informed us that the school was lacking a hygienic kitchen and cafeteria, known here as a comedor, to provide food to students.

Five months ago, Peru was hit with historic rains, flash floods and mudslides, known here as huaycos. During our initial efforts to provide relief, MEDLIFE met a mother from a local school, Colegio Inmaculada in Naña. She informed MEDLIFE that the school was lacking a proper sanitary area for the children to eat, also known as a comedor. Without this comedor, the school is at risk of losing access to the government program Qali Warma (Healthy Child in Quechua), which provides free meals to students in low-income communities.
MEDLIFE is in the early stages of building a new comedor with the community. This project will ensure the continuation of the Qali Warma program, providing 160 students with nutritious food at school.

"The sky is the limit if you have a roof over your head."- Sol Hurok
 
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There are many moving parts that go into the creation of a safe building, but in Peruvian construction, the roof is considered the most important. A completed roof symbolizes a completed project. The walls may need spackling and a fresh coat of paint, and the floor may need cleaning, but these are just aesthetic changes. No matter what, with a finished roof, a project is ready to be used. 
 
2Carlos Benavides, director of MED Programs Peru, stands with the materials required to fill in the roof.
 
On Sunday, June 25, 2017, just two months after the plans were finalized and the community agreement was signed, MEDLIFE Staff headed out to Union de Santa Fe to see the completed roof on the second floor of the wawa wasi.  Union de Santa Fe community members, along with a few of the MEDLIFE interns, hauled countless buckets of rocks and sand to the cement mixer until the roof was finished and ready to be inaugurated. 
 
3With the addition of a cement mixer, a machine not readily available on project days, we were able to finish the roof in just one day!
 
5MEDLIFE Summer interns, Brandy and Jana, pass a bucket of rocks down the cement assembly line.
 
4Project days might be tough work, but they are definitely fun, too!
 
The first floor to the Wawa Wasi was completed in 2015 , and serves as a space for the Cuna Más program. Cuna Mas is a government program which provides trained childcare personnel and nutritional meals for kids. However, it is only available to kids between 6 months and 3 years old. In Peru, children don't start primary school until age 6, so kids who are between ages 3 and 6 can't enjoy the facilities. The new second floor of the Wawa Wasi will be used for a program called PRONOEI, a preschool for children ages 3-6. This addition aims to close the 3 year gap between when children age out of Cuna Más and start primary school, as well as provide a safe childcare facility for the children of working parents.  

 6Members of Union de Santa Fe spread the concrete mixture on the Wawa Wasi's roof.

7Ricardo Ccasani, Union de Santa Fe community leader and MEDLIFE staff member, fixes a leak in the pipe carrying cement to the roof. 

8Thanks to the immense support of the Union de Santa Fe community, the Wawa Wasi roof was completed in just four hours!

9The summer interns take a break from all the hard work to pose for a quick picture!

10MEDLIFE Staff members, Martha, Rosali, Raúl, Edinson, Angie, and Dr. Nick Ellis, pose in front of the Wawa Wasi after the inauguration.

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